Eighth grader Drew Glaser ’24 bounces up to varsity squash

Drew Glaser in practice, December 6, 2019 – photo by Tyler Zimmer ’21

Fords squash defines itself through success. Arguably the most nationally recognized program Haverford had to offer in 2018-19, they surely could not improve. Until they did. A squash match consists of nine players facing opponents equal to them on their respective “ladder.” Out of those nine starting players, only two graduated as seniors in 2019.

     Filling one of those roles is a name you may not recognize because he does not walk the halls with you. Instead, you will have to find Second Former Drew Glaser on the other side of campus in the interim facilities.

     Yes, that’s right. Second Form. Eighth Grade. Middle School.

     Glaser may be young, but his success speaks for itself.

     “I’ve won the last three [Junior Champion Tour Tournaments] and I’m currently number one in the country for boys under 15,” Glaser said.

     U.S. Squash defines these events as “the marquee tournaments on the U.S. Squash junior calendar and are hosted at many of the top universities in the country, including Yale, Harvard, Princeton and the University of Pennsylvania.”

     Winning matches in these events draws college recognition. Glaser does not only participate in these big tournaments, he dominates them. 

     Glaser’s teammates are confident his individual success will translate into team matches. 

     Sixth Form captain and future Division-I squash player Graham Joyce said, “He is a very talented and skillful player [who] has great potential to play at the top of our ladder.”

     The current number-one, Sixth Former Christain Shah agreed.

“He’s probably the most humble number-one player in the country I’ve seen. You’ll never hear him talk about his results or accomplishments. He carries himself with class and good sportsmanship on the court.”

Captain Christian Shah ’20

     “He’s probably the most humble number-one player in the country I’ve seen. You’ll never hear him talk about his results or accomplishments,” Shah said. “He carries himself with class and good sportsmanship on the court.”

     The feelings are mutual, and the age gap does not affect the team’s strong chemistry.

     “I’ve always looked up to Christian and Graham,” Drew said.

     While being up to four years younger than his competition fails to affect Drew negatively, it is a unique experience.

     “Playing kids older than me this year has been a great experience, and I’ve already improved a lot.”

     At the top of the ladder, Drew practices with elite competition on a regular basis.

     Fifth Former Quintin Campbell said, “Drew is an amazing player, and I’m sure he knows that everyone he plays is gunning for him. Playing an eighth grader, people feel more pressure to win and therefore go all out.”

     “I’m never happy with the idea of losing a bunch of points to an eighth grader,” Shah said. “But what you have to realize is that he doesn’t have the skill set of a typical eighth grader.”

     Drew plays with the maturity of an older player. His natural ability, combined with his stellar work ethic, allotted for his prior success and will provide exactly what the team needs in the future.

    The Brunswick School placed first in last year’s national high school championships. They are the only program in the country to match Haverford’s powerhouse lineup.

 “Even if it seems impossible, my goal is to take them down and win the national championship.”

Drew Glaser ’24

     “Even if it seems impossible,” Glaser said, “my goal is to take them down and win the national championship.”

Author: Tyler Zimmer '21

Managing Editor Tyler Zimmer '21 has written for each section of The Index since 2018. He previously served as Arts Editor. In addition to journalism, Tyler plays baseball and golf, and he is often found working in the art studio.