Athletic contests threaten safety

Arsh Aggarwal ’24

With coronavirus cases still rising throughout the country, the school should not risk student health for a couple of athletic contests. 

     The school’s decision to run practices for sports was itself controversial and left many families and students apprehensive. Sports like football and soccer, where social distancing is almost impossible to enforce, were the main source of worry.

     After only about a month of practice, the Inter-Ac League decided to introduce a fall season. In an email sent by football coach Mr. Brain Martin, he explains that “Given the current low rates of community transmission in our area, the Inter-Ac is planning a modified non-championship fall sports schedule.” 

     These “low rates of community transmission” are because of diligent abiding to rules that most schools and institutions are following, but by running sports games, the transmission will inevitably increase. 

     The community has worked incredibly hard to return to school safely and even give students a glimpse of sports throughout the last few months, but that does not justify increasing risk and pushing the limits. This argument makes it feel like the school is purposefully searching for ways to put students at increased risk, and it is not okay.

While everyone hopes for the best, the risks cannot be ignored, and if all does go wrong, time in-person could be over. 

     It is undeniable that our community heavily revolves around competition. The thing is, teams do not need to have games with other schools to fuel this competitive nature. Inter-team scrimmages provide ample competition while keeping athletes safer. 

     In the end, it is all about priorities. The school has prioritized athletics—this time risking everything and everyone in the process. While everyone hopes for the best, the risks cannot be ignored, and if all does go wrong, time in-person could be over. 

     For the sake of the students, the administration must rethink and revise its priority on sports.